These raw vegan oatmeal raisin cookie dough bites are like an oatmeal raisin cookie but no-bake and easy to make in minutes.

A number of no-bake cookie dough balls with raisins on a plate.

Recipe Features

  • vegan and gluten-free – works if you have dietary restrictions
  • quick and easy – you’ll need just a few ingredients and 10 minutes
  • healthier snacking – enjoy for a healthier sweet snack
  • travel well – perfect for hiking, camping, lunch boxes, and road trips

What You’ll Need

  • dates – medjool or sayer dates are best
  • oats – rolled oats or quick oats works
  • almond butter – use natural, creamy almond butter
  • maple syrup –
  • raisins – any kind of raisin works, chocolate chips are also good if you want to switch it up!

Recipe Method

Add everything except the raisins to a food processor and mix into a sticky dough you can press between your fingers. Add the raisins and pulse a few times to combine.

Oats, almond butter and dates in a food processor.

Roll the dough into balls and enjoy!

A number of no-bake cookie dough balls with raisins on a plate.

Tips and FAQs

  • It’s important to use soft, moist dates in this recipe. If your dates are on the dry side, soak them in hot water for 15 minutes then drain before using.
  • Almond butter can be substituted with peanut butter or cashew butter, or for nut-free, Wowbutter, tahini or sunflower seed butter.

What if the dough isn’t sticking together?

If your almond butter or dates were too dry, the dough may be too crumbly to stick together. Add warm water 1 tsp at a time and blend again until you can press the dough together between your fingers. Using wet hands to roll the balls will also help.

If you’re worried about the dough being crumbly, I’d recommend soaking the dates first.

How should I store these?

The balls will keep in the fridge for up to 2 weeks and freezer for up to 2 months. They’re fine out of the fridge for a day, probably longer if you can keep them cool! If taking on the road, I’d recommend storing them in the freezer beforehand.

A close up of a cookie dough ball with raisins in it on a counter top.

Related Recipes

Loving these sweet, little treats? Check this out too:

For more oatmeal raisin goodness, try my vegan oatmeal raisin chocolate chip cookies or no-bake oatmeal raisin bars.

Did you make this recipe? Click here to leave a review!

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A close up of a cookie dough ball with raisins in it on a counter top.

Oatmeal Raisin Cookie Dough Bites

  • Author: Deryn Macey
  • Prep Time: 10 mins
  • Total Time: 10 mins
  • Yield: 12 1x
  • Category: Snack
  • Method: Food Processor
  • Cuisine: American
  • Diet: Vegan

These sweet little no-bake oatmeal raisin balls are inspired by classic oatmeal raisin cookies. Enjoy one for a snack or healthier treat any time of day.


Scale

Ingredients


Instructions

  1. Add everything except the raisins to a food processor and mix into a sticky dough.
  2. Add the raisins and pulse a few times to combine. 
  3. Roll the dough into approximately 12 balls.
  4. Store in the fridge or freezer in an air-tight container.

Notes

The balls will keep in the fridge for up to 2 weeks and freezer for up to 2 months. They’re fine out of the fridge for a day, probably longer if you can keep them cool! If taking on the road, I’d recommend storing them in the freezer beforehand.

If your almond butter or dates were too dry, the dough may be too crumbly to stick together. Add warm water 1 tsp at a time and blend again until you can press the dough together between your fingers. Using wet hands to roll the balls will also help.

It’s important to use soft, moist dates in this recipe. If your dates are on the dry side, soak them in hot water for 15 minutes then drain before using.

Almond butter can be substituted with peanut butter or cashew butter, or for nut-free, Wowbutter, tahini or sunflower seed butter.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 ball
  • Calories: 124
  • Fat: 3
  • Carbohydrates: 21
  • Protein: 2.4

Keywords: oatmeal raisin balls, oatmeal raisin cookie dough

Update Note: This recipe was originally published March 26, 2014. It was updated with new photos and text on June 14, 2020.